God at work

A letter to work colleagues:

Hi everyone,

Firstly I’d like to thank everyone.  Between COVID, more restrictions, our work, our lives outside work, all of which pulls us all in different directions and risk tearing us to bits as individuals, it is lovely to see everyone supporting each other in prayer. It is beautiful to behold, so thank you so much for being who you are.

We’re still trying to meet up online for prayers (in work).  Not all of us can make it at the time, and that is fine, we all do have so much going on (I think I’d be bored if I didn’t).  What I think is important to remember is that even when we are apart, we are at our closest through our relationship with Jesus – so long as we all continue to carry Him in our hearts, we can know that we are not alone.  He is walking beside us and links us all as a family, brothers and sisters in Christ.  Just remember it’s a huge family, well beyond our circles, our church, our parish, or our nation – there are people abroad who have never met you who are supporting you in prayer as much as we support them in prayer.  Just as Jesus prayed for his disciples, so he prayed for each of us.

Jesus Prays for All Believers
20 “My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, 21 that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 

John 17:20-21

I recently bought yet another book (it should come as no surprise to those who know me) called “Working in the Presence of God”, by Denise Daniels and Shannon Vandewarker and is subtitled “Spiritual Practices for Everyday Work”.  Admittedly I’m not very far through it, but I thought I might try to share some thoughts on what I’m reading.  The book is in three sections, then chapters in each; it looks at Orienting, Engaging and Reflecting on work.

My first bit of reading reminded me that God, too, is a worker, especially a creative worker (lousy pun intended).  I mean, look at all He managed to achieve; and we’re not just talking about small projects here; even still, He put as much care and attention into the smallest project as He did with the largest.  The part I’m reading now looks at how our spiritual and secular worlds are divided.  It is a sad thing to say, but yes, they are.  It touches on another interesting topic which is encapsulated by the word Ordinary.  How do we find God in the Ordinary around us?  Well, one way of looking at it is to remember the creation story. Remember God worked, how everything He created in His eyes was right, how He breathed His breath into Adam, how he gave Adam and Eve a job to do. We can find Him in the Ordinary; possibly, we only need to reorient our understanding of what it means.

We’re in the middle of looking at Ephesians in one bible study. We’ve had a chance to reflect in small groups and when we were talking about prayer being as-you-go or on a schedule, someone talked about how they mostly prayed in church. It is an obvious example of how our secular and our spiritual lives are different.  They separated their time with God by using the church as the focal point for their relationship with God, probably through no fault of their own as our lives have many demands on our time.  With this in mind, please take time to reflect on this. Do we have any self-imposed boundaries between our secular lives (our job, for instance) and our spiritual life (our relationship with God)? Remember that God is always present with us, even when we are not present for Him, and incredibly close in those times when we need Him the most.

God bless us all